The River Severn: Alternative Journeys

Public History Discussion Group

Saturday 16th May 2015

The River Severn: Alternative Journeys

Following a river from source to estuary is the obvious way to do it, isn’t it?  My photographic study of the River Severn suggests that this linear view of the landscape has an impact upon how it is viewed by those familiar with it.  This in turn determines what is and what is not deemed to be important in the past.  I use my own collection of photographs in an exploration of salmon fishing, and in an exhibition in Bewdley to discuss this.

The River Severn Alternative Journeys

Linda Shapiro

After a career in medicine, Linda found that Public History gave her quite an alternative view on life. She completed her MA at Ruskin College where she used her interest in the River Severn to explore wider issues. Her enthusiasm for the river continues unabated, but she’s pouring her present energies into an investigation of Victorian Dewsbury.

Room 612

Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

Come along for tea/coffee at 11am which will be served in the Staff Common Room

Room on the 6th floor- lift and stairs to all floors

Talk starts promptly at 11.30am

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Negotiating control in the construction of the mental health recovery archive

Public History Discussion Group 

Saturday 25th April 2015 

Room 612 – Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

Come along for tea/coffee at 11am which will be served in the Staff Common Room

Room on the 6th floor- lift and stairs to all floors

Talk starts promptly at 11.30am

‘Negotiating control in the construction of the mental health recovery archive’

PHDG1

The mental health recovery archive is online at: http://mentalhealthrecovery.omeka.net. It contains personal testimony and expressions of identity from four contributors who have lived experience of mental health recovery.  In this talk I will share my experiences of being the archivist and PhD researcher who instigated the project with reflections on what I perceived to be the challenges of sharing authority and developing reciprocity in the construction of the archive.

 

Anna Sexton, Department of Information Studies

University College London

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Making public forgotten black histories 1750-2014: From ghostly hands to children’s memorials on slave graves

Public History Discussion Group

Saturday 21st March 2015
Room 209
Institute of Archaeology, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY
Room on the 2nd floor- lift and stairs to all floors
Talk starts promptly at 11.30am
PH-Group

The talk discusses not only traditional memorials, walking trails and artworks, but also ghostly legacies of the trade, including human body parts. Taking the small slave port of Lancaster, England, as a key case study, the talk draws on recent theoretical work on corporeality, spectrality, Holocaust studies, trauma, dark tourism, the Black Atlantic and memory studies to interrogate the meanings of these legacies. It develops the idea of “guerrilla memorialisation” used historically and in recent responses to the trade.

Professor Alan Rice, University of Central Lancashire

Alan Rice is Professor in English and American Studies at the University of Central Lancashire and co-director of the recently formed Institute for Black Atlantic Research (IBAR) there. He has degrees from the University of Edinburgh, Bowling Green State University, Ohio and Keele. He has worked on the interdisciplinary study of the Black Atlantic for the past two decades including publishing Radical Narratives of the Black Atlantic (Continuum, 2003). Alan was academic advisor to the Slave Trade Arts Memorial Project in Lancaster, was editor in chief of Manchester’s Revealing Histories Website and a co-curator of the Whitworth Art Gallery Manchester’s 2007-8 exhibition Trade and Empire: Remembering Slavery. His latest monograph is Creating Memorials, Building Identities: The Politics of Memory in the
Black Atlantic (Liverpool UP, 2010) and his latest edited collection is a special issue of Atlantic Studies on the “Slave Trade’s Dissonant Heritage” edited with Johanna Kardux (2012). He is also continuing the work on black abolitionists in Britain started in his co-edited Liberating Sojourn: Frederick Douglass and Transatlantic Reform (Georgia, 1999) with a new collection in Slavery and Abolition (2012) with Fionnghuala Sweeney. He is an advisor to museums in Liverpool, Lancaster and Manchester and his latest museum publication is a catalogue essay for Manchester’s 2012 We Face Forward West African Art exhibition. His articles have appeared in a wide range of journals including, Slavery and Abolition, Atlantic Studies, Patterns of Prejudice, Journal of American Studies and Research in African Literatures. He has organised landmark events on issues in Black history in Britain including a 2013 event commemorating the mutiny of African American GIs in Bamber Bridge. He has given keynote presentations in Britain, Germany, the United State and France and in January 2012 he gave the Martin Luther King Memorial Lecture in Hamburg. He has contributed to documentaries for the BBC, Border Television and public broadcasting in America as well as appearing on BBC’s The One Show in February 2013. More information can be found at:
http://ibaruclan.com/
http://www.english.heacademy.ac.uk/explore/publications/newsletters/newsissue14/king1.htm
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/alan_rice.php
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/about_us/case_studies/sollis_marks_70th_anniversary_of_battle_of_bamber_bridge_report.php

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Voicing the stories of the excluded: Albanian families’ identity and history making in Athens, Greece

Public History Discussion Group

Saturday 21st February 2015 at 11:30 am Eleni Vomvyla UCL Institute of Archaeology

In my talk I draw from my ethnographic/participatory work with five Albanian families in Athens, Greece as part of my PhD research. By sharing lives with participants for a period of over a year across multiple settings, I will be showing how individuals’ identities inform memory selection and history making, i.e. what it is to be remembered (or forgotten) and what it is to be passed down (or not) to the future generation.

PH-Group-Feb

Eleni Vomvyla holds a PhD in Cultural Heritage (UCL Institute of Archaeology) and has worked as a Research Associate at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. She has been awarded a Beacon Bursary and a Small Grants Scheme from the UCL European Institute. Eleni is currently undertaking an internship as an evaluator in the Natural History Museum, London.

 

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Love thy neighbour: inter-neighbour relations and the syntax of complaint in early 20th century London.

In researching the history of my flat – a one-bedroomed former tenement designed by Octavia Hill in 1903 – I stumbled upon some letters of complaint in an archive.  The letters revealed the main concerns and antagonisms between the neighbours in the early 20th century.

Anna Robinson University of East London

Anna Robinson is a Public History graduate from Ruskin College, Oxford and a published poet.  She was 2014 Poet-in-Residence on Lower Marsh Market.  Anna is author of Into the Woods (Enitharmon Press 2014) and The Finders of London which was shortlisted for the Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Prize in 2011.  Anna also edited the Lambeth Pamphlet History Series for Lambeth Archives, is poetry editor for Not Shut Up Magazine and founding editor for The Long Poem Magazine.

See Anna’s website www.annarobinsonpoetry.co.uk

Venue

The Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY.

Nearest tube stations are Euston Square (Circle, Hammersmith and City & Metropolitan lines), Euston (Victoria, Northern lines and the overground) and Warren Street (Victoria and Northern lines). There is also disabled badge holders parking immediately outside the front door of the Institute.

Follow the link below for a map of the Institute and public transport guide

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Public History Discussion Group – Programme 2014 – 2015

Saturday 1st November 2014
“A pile of my history, found in my parents’ attic”: The everyday histories and archives of popular music heritage.

In this paper we ask: what kind of music heritage – what kind of histories – are constructed in museums and in non-institutional spaces, on and offline? How useful is it to describe this kind of activity in relation to ideas of mainstream and margin? What does it mean to describe popular collecting activities in relation to amateur and professional in relation to the idea of the Archive at all? For instance, how do those engaging in these practices describe them and what is it that they do when they ‘do’ heritage?

Paul Long, Professor of Media & Cultural History, Associate Director Birmingham Centre for Media & Cultural Research, Birmingham City University.

Saturday 24th January 2015
Love they neighbour: inter-neighbour relations and the syntax of complaint in early C20th London

In researching the history of my flat – a one-bedroomed former tenement designed by Octavia Hill in 1903 – I stumbled upon some letters of complaint in an archive. The letters reveal the main concerns and antagonisms between neighbours in the early 20th century.
Anna Robinson, University of East London

Saturday 21st February 2015
Voicing the stories of the excluded: Albanian families’ identity and history making in Athens, Greece

In my talk I draw from my ethnographic/participatory work with five Albanian families in Athens, Greece as part of my PhD research. By sharing their lives with participants for a period of over a year across multiple settings, I will be showing how family members’ identity informs memory selection and history making (personal, family, community, national), i.e. what it is to be remembered (or forgotten) and what it is to be passed down (or not) to the future generation.

Eleni Vomvyla, University College London, Institute of Archaeology

Saturday 21st March 2015
Making public forgotten black histories 1750-2014: From ghostly hands to children’s memorials on slave graves

Professor Alan Rice, University of Central Lancashire

Saturday 25th April 2015
Negotiating control in the construction of the mental health recovery archive

The mental health recovery archive is online at: http://mentalhealthrecovery.omeka.net. It contains personal testimony and expressions of identity from four contributors who have lived experience of mental health recovery. In this talk I will share my experiences of being the archivist and PhD researcher who instigated the project with reflections on what I perceived to be the challenges of sharing authority and developing reciprocity in the construction of the archive.

Anna Sexton, Department of Information Studies, University College London

Saturday 16th May 2015
The River Severn: Alternative Journeys

Following a river from source to estuary is the obvious way to do it, isn’t it? My photographic study of the River Severn suggests that this linear view of the landscape has an impact upon how it is viewed by those familiar with it. This in turn determines what is and what is not deemed to be important in the past. I use my own collection of photographs in an exploration of salmon fishing, and in an exhibition in Bewdley to discuss this.

Linda Shapiro, MA in Public History from Ruskin College Oxford

Please note the new venue: The Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY.

Come along for coffee at 11am with the session starting promptly at 11.30.
Follow Public History Group signs on the outer door of the Institute and in the lobby by the lifts.

Nearest tube stations are Euston Square (Circle, Hammersmith and City & Metropolitan lines), Euston (Victoria, Northern lines and the overground) and Warren Street (Victoria and Northern lines). Disabled badge holders parking immediately outside the front door of the Institute. Follow the link below for a map of the Institute and public transport guide https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/contact

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Public History Workshop Meeting – Saturday 1st November 2014

A pile of my history, found in my parents’ attic”: The everyday histories and archives of popular music heritage.

Paul Long, Professor of Media and Cultural History, Associate Director of Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research, Birmingham City University

Saturday 1st November 2014

Room 209: UCL Institute of Archaeology

Come along for coffee at 11am which will be served in the Student Common Room on the 6th floor – lift and stairs to all floors

Talk starts promptly at 11.30am

Sex Pistols on stage at Bogarts, Birmingham 20th October 1976 From the Birmingham Music Archives uploaded by a member of the audience

Sex Pistols on stage at Bogarts, Birmingham 20th October 1976
From the Birmingham Music Archives uploaded by a member of the audience

Paul Long: Professor of Media and Cultural History; Associate Director, Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research at Birmingham City University. Current research project is as communities work package lead in Cultural intermediation and the creative economy (see http://www.culturalintermediation.org.uk ).

Co-author of “Online Archival Practice and Virtual Sites of Musical Memory” in Sites of Popular Music Heritage 2014 Routledge with Jez Collins: Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research, Birmingham City University. (Founder of the Birmingham Popular Music Archive see http://www.birminghammusicarchive.com ).

Around the world, a large number of collaborative, participatory heritage and public history practices are emerging that archive, preserve, celebrate and share the material remnants of popular music aiming to safeguard the national and local histories of this cultural form.
In this paper we ask: what kind of music heritage – what kind of histories – are constructed in museums and in non-institutional spaces, on and offline? How useful is it to describe this kind of activity in relation to ideas of mainstream and margin? What does it mean to describe popular collecting activities in relation to amateur and professional in relation to the idea of the Archive at all? For instance, how do those engaging in these practices describe them and what is that they do when they ‘do’ heritage? Ultimately, what kind of ideas about music as public history do these practices reveal? What values and approaches to the validation of popular culture does everyday collecting, preservation and display present?

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